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Thursday, December 14, 2017

The connection between climate change and global food rates

Credit: climate change and global food crisis
Global food crisis and Climate Change

Extreme weather linked to change in climate has been wreaking havoc on global crops.

Extreme weather linked to change in climate has been wreaking havoc on global crops. Global food demand is increasing as supplies are diminished by bad weather. Soaring globe food prices are threatening the stability of governments and more intense weather is in the forecast.

Rise in costs of food throughout the world

Last month, world food rates went to an all time high. In December the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Food Price Index beat the record set during the 2008 food turmoil. World food prices went up in Jan another 3 percent according to the FAO. The spike in world food prices is being driven by a surge in prices for wheat, corn, sugar and oils. A Russian drought last year reduced global wheat stockpiles. Flooding in Brazil and Australia further damaged global food production. Feb. 8, FAO warned that severe drought threatened the wheat crop in China. In order to meet domestic desire, China has become the world’s largest wheat producer. Wheat can be needed by 1.3 billion Chinese from another source soon.

Persistent global food desire

There has been more of a desire for food globally at the same time weather it hurting food production. Each day, there are 200,000 more individuals that need food in the globe. Several of them end up starving though. More milk, meat and eggs are being added to the diets of 3 billion attempting to gain the standard of living while others are starving. The grain in the United States produces about 400 million tons. About 120 million tons of that is used to make care ethanol. The food crisis in 2008 was made up for with the record harvest. In order to stop the food rates from going up drastically, a crop even better than that may have to happen in 2011.

Climate change

Huge food problems might occur soon. It could very easily occur with some kind of poor harvest. Record shows 2010 to be the warmest ever. This is throughout the globe. The temperature ranges rose, which hurt the land. It got too dry. Warmer oceans unleashed water vapors, flooding others. When it comes to climate change though, meteorologists suggest that there can be more frequent droughts and flooding soon. Global food desire will continue to increase although global food production may decline. The poor in the world will be impacted. They'll go hungry. Food riots will proliferate, and political unrest will spread.

Articles cited

MSNBC

msnbc.msn.com/id/41481344/?gt1=43001

Christian Science Monitor

csmonitor.com/Commentary/Global-Viewpoint/2011/0208/Brace-yourself-for-the-food-price-bubble

New York Times

nytimes.com/2011/02/07/opinion/07krugman.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1297353635-Tca/D BUBe4oUeR0tS4SYw

food crisis, climate change, extreme weather, global cropsThe connection between climate change and global food ratesExtreme weather linked to change in climate has been wreaking havoc on global crops. Global food demand is increasing as supplies are diminished by bad weather. Soaring globe food prices are threatening the stability of governments and more intense weather is in the forecast.

Rise in costs of food throughout the world

Last month, world food rates went to an all time high. In December the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Food Price Index beat the record set during the 2008 food turmoil. World food prices went up in Jan another 3 percent according to the FAO. The spike in world food prices is being driven by a surge in prices for wheat, corn, sugar and oils. A Russian drought last year reduced global wheat stockpiles. Flooding in Brazil and Australia further damaged global food production. Feb. 8, FAO warned that severe drought threatened the wheat crop in China. In order to meet domestic desire, China has become the world’s largest wheat producer. Wheat can be needed by 1.3 billion Chinese from another source soon.

Persistent global food desire

There has been more of a desire for food globally at the same time weather it hurting food production. Each day, there are 200,000 more individuals that need food in the globe. Several of them end up starving though. More milk, meat and eggs are being added to the diets of 3 billion attempting to gain the standard of living while others are starving. The grain in the United States produces about 400 million tons. About 120 million tons of that is used to make care ethanol. The food crisis in 2008 was made up for with the record harvest. In order to stop the food rates from going up drastically, a crop even better than that may have to happen in 2011.

Climate change

Huge food problems might occur soon. It could very easily occur with some kind of poor harvest. Record shows 2010 to be the warmest ever. This is throughout the globe. The temperature ranges rose, which hurt the land. It got too dry. Warmer oceans unleashed water vapors, flooding others. When it comes to climate change though, meteorologists suggest that there can be more frequent droughts and flooding soon. Global food desire will continue to increase although global food production may decline. The poor in the world will be impacted. They'll go hungry. Food riots will proliferate, and political unrest will spread.

Articles cited

MSNBC

msnbc.msn.com/id/41481344/?gt1=43001

Christian Science Monitor

csmonitor.com/Commentary/Global-Viewpoint/2011/0208/Brace-yourself-for-the-food-price-bubble

New York Times

nytimes.com/2011/02/07/opinion/07krugman.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1297353635-Tca/D BUBe4oUeR0tS4SYw



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