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Monday, October 23, 2017

BONDS INDICTED! (finally.)

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Will O.J. and Barry share a jail cell?

Barry Bonds was indicted on federal charges of perjury and obstruction of justice yesterday, striking a blow against baseball's all-time home run leader in his ongoing struggle against allegations of steroid use. The indictment, which many people felt was fading fast and would never happen, is finally here.

This is not just local or regional news, this is a report that has taken a spot on the worldwide stage. President Bush even issued a statement yesterday about the indictment. When was the last time you heard a U.S. President comment about a baseball-related incident? This is big, no doubt about it!

Bonds, 43, was charged with four counts of perjury and one count of obstruction by federal prosecutors at a California District Court in San Francisco. These are serious charges and even more severe than many people anticipated.

Each of the perjury charges carries a jail sentence of up to five years, while the obstruction charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years. (Maybe he and O.J. will be sharing a cell in a prison’s “Hall of Shame” athlete’s wing.)

The charges mark the end of a four-year investigation into whether the former San Francisco Giants slugger lied under oath to a grand jury probing the use of performance-enhancing drugs.
It certainly constitutes a devastating end to what had been a magical year for Bonds, who passed Hank Aaron to become baseball's all-time home run scorer on August 7.
According to the indictment, Bonds allegedly lied when he claimed he did not knowingly take steroids issued to him by personal trainer Greg Anderson, who served three months in prison after pleading guilty to steroid distribution.

Anderson, who’ll be forever remembered as a stand up guy for not ratting out his friend, was released from jail yesterday.

"During the criminal investigation, evidence was obtained including positive tests for the presence of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing substances for Bonds and other professional athletes," the indictment read.

A seven-time National League MVP, Bonds is the most central figure linked with grand jury investigations launched in 2002 against Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative - known popularly as BALCO.

Allegations and speculation of steroid use have followed Bonds for the last five years, questioning the legitimacy of the all-time records he currently owns.
Aside from his career homer record of 762, Bonds also holds the single-season record of 73 - a mark he established in 2001.

"This is a very sad day," the Giants said in a statement.

"For many years, Barry Bonds was an important member of our team and is one of the most talented baseball players of his era. Now that the judicial process has begun, we look forward to this matter being resolved in a court of law."

According to the indictment, Bonds allegedly lied when he claimed he did not knowingly take steroids issued to him by personal trainer Greg Anderson, who was sentenced to prison for contempt of court on refusing to testify against Bonds.

According to a report on ESPN on Thursday, a federal judge ordered Anderson released to prison.

"During the criminal investigation, evidence was obtained including positive tests for the presence of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing substances for Bonds and other professional athletes," the indictment read.

Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig issued a statement early Thursday evening regarding the federal prosecutors' decision.

"I have yet to see the details of this indictment and while everyone in America is considered innocent until proven guilty, I take this indictment very seriously and will follow its progress closely," the statement read.

"It is important that the facts regarding steroid use in baseball be known, which is why I asked Senator Mitchell to investigate the issue.

"I look forward to receiving his report and findings so that we can openly address any issue associated with past steroid use.

"We currently have a testing program that is as good as any in professional sports, and the program is working.
We continue to fund research to find an efficacious test for HGH and have banned amphetamines from our sport.
We will continue to work diligently to eradicate the use of all illegal performance-enhancing substances from the game."

MLB Players' Association executive director Donald Fehr also released a statement addressing the indictment.

"I was saddened to learn this afternoon of the indictment of Barry Bonds," Fehr said in the statement.

"However, we must remember, as the U.S. Attorney stated in his press release today, that an indictment contains only allegations, and in this country every defendant, including Barry Bonds, is entitled to the presumption of innocence unless and until such time as he is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt."

Parts of this report were taken from cbssportsline.com and mlb.com.


About the Writer

Ed Attanasio is a writer for BrooWaha. For more information, visit the writer's website.
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1 comments on BONDS INDICTED! (finally.)

Log In To Vote   Score: -2
By Creedon on December 21, 2007 at 03:38 pm
Bonds cheated. There is just way too much cheating going on. Sports, writing.
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