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Monday, November 20, 2017

All you need to know about Silestone and Quartzite Worktops

As exciting as it is to go in for a refurbishment of your kitchen, choosing the right material for the worktops that make up almost the entire “look” for the kitchen.

As exciting as it is to go in for a refurbishment of your kitchen, choosing the right material for the worktops that make up almost the entire “look” for the kitchen can be equally fun yet frustrating. With the wide variety of choices available in the market that would confuse even the most level headed person, it is important to dig through marketing messages and incomplete data to choose the material that best suits your cooking and lifestyle. Read on to know all about Silestone and Quartzite Worktops if you are considering these as the worktop material of your choice.

Silestone and Quartzite worktops are indeed excellent choices for kitchen worktops, however, there are differences in their properties, as explained below, which may help you opt for one over the other:-

  • Quartzite Worktops

Quartzite is an amazing metamorphic rock that is naturally strong, very hard to stain and resists heat. It is formed after years of continuous heat and pressure applied under the earth’s surface to sandstone. Quartzite is a derivative from sandstone as the empty grains in the original rock are filled with quartz to form quartzite, this results in quartzite being stronger than quartz.

Although quartzite is considered one of the best materials to be used for kitchen and bathroom worktops, there is still the problem of etching to occur on its surface that makes it a little less desirable.

Quartzite as a mineral stone is found worldwide, as it is very commonly formed under the surface of the earth. The most sought after variants of the stone are found in India and Brazil. Prices vary from slabs to tiles, to different colours and also from location to location.

  • Silestone Worktops

Silestone is an engineered stone compound that consists of 94% natural quartz material with the rest 6% as binding and colouring agents, and is thus extremely hard and resilient. Silestone is the only quartz base worktop that has anti-bacterial protection which gives it an extremely useful hygienic character that is unique to this brand of stone.

It is most commonly used as kitchen worktops, and its other uses extend to bathroom counters, floor and wall cladding, etc. as it uses a minimum number of joints to keep the surface looking neat and elegant.

Its other main advantage is that it is available in a wide range of quartz colours, which give it a range of possibilities of usage from basic kitchen remodelling works to complete furniture sets also. Its durable nature makes it a good investment for the future.

Generally speaking, it is a good idea to choose a worktop material that is available in the colour and the pattern that you prefer, as most natural and engineered stones have similar properties. It is only imperative to ensure that the finished stone surface has the physical capability to withstand how its going to be used- whether in a kitchen, bathroom, bar counter, etc.

In case you are still confused as to which worktop would be best for your purposes, visit the website of London based firm MKW Surfaces, and take your pick from a wide range of materials like silestone worktops, quartzite worktops, etc in different colours, styles, textures and patterns.



About the Writer

Maria Kairuz is a writer for BrooWaha. For more information, visit the writer's website.
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