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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

A Writer’s Repeating Themes

Credit: Shane Joseph
A writer on his platform

We constantly hover around the the themes that matter, whether we realize it or not.

I have been writing a blog for over five years, so I took the time to pause and review what I had written. I have written over 180 articles, averaging three a month, on a variety of subjects, all of which I thought were quite original and topical at the time. But when I re-read them, some key themes kept appearing and re-appearing. My articles seemed to fall into the following broad categories:

1)The Writing Life, its rewards and travails

2)Politics & Society, especially an exploration of the parts that do not work

3)Business Life, its necessity and its incompleteness

4)Travel

5)Social Media, its opportunities and pitfalls

6)Life Stages

So, that’s it really. One hundred and eighty articles circling around six themes. I could have written six large essays, one on each of the topics, and have had my say, packed my pen, and gone fishing. Instead, I circled around pet peeves, unearthing new material and coming at them from different angles each time, a veritable dog with a bone, or six of them.

Is this what most writers do? Exorcise their ghosts by repeatedly confronting them, or do they stand on a platform and make their point until people turn a blind eye and a deaf ear? Dickens returned to the nemesis of his childhood, the workhouse, time and time again; Twain sailed the Mississippi back and forth; Hemingway confronted death not only in the afternoon but everywhere and all the time until the last instant of his life; Lawrence was trapped in the sex act; and Joyce walked the streets of Dublin even when he no longer lived there.

This question went through my mind as I pored over my 180 articles, thinking of the time and effort that had gone into writing them. I know that thousands of readers have read them, if I can trust the tracking meters on all the sites I had them posted on. But did anyone change their life as a result of these articles? Did anyone even say, “Ah, ha!” That, I will never know. All I know is that my life stayed in balance for having written them, perhaps it even changed for the better, when I realized that I could not change the world but could change myself and accept the unchangeable.

So that’s it, I concluded: I was not writing for an audience, I was writing for my own therapy and survival. These themes were important to me and still are; that’s why I keep returning to them time and time again. And in rereading them, I have come to appreciate them even more. The issues I have been absorbed with are unsolvable and need to be confronted in their many guises. The more aggressive minded may join political organizations, non-profit organizations and/or service clubs to deal with matters that are important to them, matters that will prevail long after the activists have shuffled off this mortal coil. But like them, the writer too shows his activism by continuing to write about those unsolvable issues that matter most to him. The act of confronting them is the sign of never giving up. To give up is to die.

Okay, back to the grind. What shall I write about next? Should it be on the writing life, or politics and society, or business life....?



About the Writer

Shane Joseph is a writer for BrooWaha. For more information, visit the writer's website.
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2 comments on A Writer’s Repeating Themes

Log In To Vote   Score: 1
By Credo on September 23, 2013 at 09:01 pm

That is so true, writers write about the subjects they are familiar with, and that same information shows up in most of their work.

It's good to reassess your own articles to determine where your general interest are. To further challenge yourself to expand into other arenas of artistic journalism, appears to be the best way to develope and grow.

:)Credo

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Log In To Vote   Score: 1
By Shane Joseph on September 23, 2013 at 09:12 pm

credo - i like your definition "artistic journalism."

thanks for your comments.

shane

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