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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Breivik was what Norway Deserved

Credit: meltybuzz
Richard Millet - exceptionally banal

Mass murder is understandable, says a doyen of the French literary establishment. Mediocrity is even more understandable.

It was Hannah Arendt who coined the phrase ‘the banality of evil’ in reference Adolf Eichmann, a cog in the machine of the Holocaust. It’s rather a pity in a way because it really should have been invented specifically to describe Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian mass murderer who killed seventy-seven people in a hate-filled rampage last July

Hate-filled; is that right? Actually I’m not quite sure, not quite sure that this man is capable of any authentic emotion, not quite sure if he is able to understand anything beyond his own shallow and narcissistic fantasies. He was sentenced to twenty-one years in prison last Friday, the maximum allowed for under Norwegian law, though the indicators are that he will never be released. The sentence made no impact on him; all he could do was smirk, happy that he was not declared insane.

His crime began with a bang; his trial ended with a whimper. There he was, the living symbol of the most crushing forms of mediocrity - mundane, tiresome and downright boring. After sentence was passed he made to get on his soap box, saying that the only regret he had was that he had not killed more people. Bubble and squeak it went, until the judge, who clearly had had enough, cut him off and sent him down. The rest is silence

Or, rather, it would have been silence. It took a Frenchman to echo in the void; it took Richard Millet, an author, I understand, of some repute, to tell the world that Breivik was “without doubt what Norway deserves.” Least he be misunderstood he rushed to say that he did not approve of his actions. No, he merely described them as “formal perfection…in their literary dimension”. Yes, I know; your guess is as good as mine. This, it would seem, is what accomplished authors accomplish in France.

He accomplished these precious sentiments recently in an essay entitled Eloge littéraire d'Anders Breivik – Literary Elegy of Anders Breivik - , a justification after the act. Breivik, he says, “is as much a child of a broken family as of an ideological and racial fracture caused by immigration from outside Europe over the last 20 years.”

On and on and on he goes, a perfect storm of verbal mush. The Norwegian is “an exemplary product of Western decadence” and a “child of the ideologico-racial fracture that extra-European immigration has introduced in Europe.” He sees the resulting “loss of national identity” and “Islamisation of Europe” decaying “Christian roots” everywhere. Hold tight – you a’int herad nothin yet.

I think there are genuine issue to be addressed over the negative effects of multiculturalism and mass immigration; these are issues that I have addressed myself, here and elsewhere. But for an act of callous stupidity and disregard for human life to be give a post hoc justification is – how can I say? – well, it’s what passes for literary merit…in France.

Incidentally, Breivik’s victims are neatly summed up as “mixed-raced, globalized, uncultivated, social-democrat petit bourgeois.” So, now you know; not human beings just mixed-raced, globalized, uncultivated, social-democrat petit bourgeois.

Meanwhile the author is rather basking in his notoriety, a little like the Norwegian without literary merit. “I’m one of the most hated French authors. It’s an interesting position that makes me an exceptional being”, he said recently, very much in the same self-regarding style as his fellow narcissist in Norway. No, Richard, you are not an exceptional being, just another mediocrity. You are not even the act, just the shadow of the act, the true inner core of banality.



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Anastasia is a writer for BrooWaha. For more information, visit the writer's website.
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8 comments on Breivik was what Norway Deserved

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By TonyBerkman on August 30, 2012 at 10:16 pm

well said

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By simplysud on August 31, 2012 at 02:52 pm

where there is a tragedy, there exists a Millet.

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By Agit8r on September 01, 2012 at 01:53 pm

Someone should make Millet into porridge.

And Norway should have tougher murder laws.

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By Anastasia on September 02, 2012 at 05:27 pm

Thanks, Tony.

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By Anastasia on September 02, 2012 at 05:27 pm

SS, a sad truth.

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By Anastasia on September 02, 2012 at 05:28 pm

Agit, I'm more than happy to assist in the process! As I say, he's unlikely ever to be released.

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By joshuaallen on September 07, 2012 at 03:54 pm

I was only able to read the smallish sample that Amazon uk sent to my Kindle. (plus my French could be better) Which do you dislike more? The repulsive way the guy chose to market his pamphlets using such incendiary words? Or his actual message which seems somewhat consistent with your writings? I suspect it is the latter. Yet, after everything, a philospher and literary critque must eat...yes? And the French do it so well!

BTW, I just ordered 'Cannae's Ghosts' Victor Hanson calls it a masterpiece? Nuff said. Thanks for the write up, I may never have seen it.

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By Anastasia on September 09, 2012 at 05:33 pm

Joshua, as I say, I think there are issues with mass immigration, deracination and multi-culturalism that we would do well not to ignore. I dislike Millet because he has turned the whole debate into intellectual porridge, tasteless and distasteful.

The Ghosts of Cannae is a very well crafted piece of historical writing, though I did not go quite as far as Hanson! I now have Richard Miles’ Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilisation, which is a little more wide-ranging than O’Connell’s book. I hope to read it either before I go or when I’m in Tunisia, in situ, so to speak.

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