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Monday, November 20, 2017

Reclaiming the Self

Credit: Only through emptiness can we truly know ourselves
Only through emptiness can we truly know ourselves

Your true nature is revealed only when you let go of the nature you have constructed.

Most of us start life with a self, an authentic yet undeveloped self, from which we build an identity designed to interface with the world we gradually discover is around us. There are as many kinds of souls as pebbles on a beach, and yet the majority of us end up looking and behaving so much alike.

This conformity allows us to adopt a social role and function in a society of others; the more diverse our habits and behaviours the less cohesive will be the group. And yet no matter how conventional we appear be, all of us are in a constant dialogue between our inner selves and the world around us.

But this process becomes skewed when we encounter prejudice at an early age, which teaches us to disavow that original self and focus too much of our attentions on the social interface we create. If the prejudice is strong enough – from family or the community – we can easily forget ourselves and start believing that we are our construct.

While this ability to construct an acceptable persona is highly effective for conformity, when taken to extreme our potential is diminished because we cannot access the energy and vision our true selves provide us. Motivated by what we believe others want can never lead to anything that is not rigid, fragile and compromised.

It’s been my experience that the most growth starts with disassembling. Many of us have years of accumulated behaviours and learning that mask our true natures, and it’s only when those are discarded can we really manifest what we were created to be.

It’s an awesome and humbling process because you have to surrender many layers of deeply held values and beliefs until you are naked to yourself and to your God. Identity, personality, and how you understand your relationship to yourself and the outer world. It is a journey not for the faint of heart, for reconnecting with your true nature means giving up all props and coping behaviours until there are no illusions as to your utter frailty and inconsequence.

But from that essential child’s place, in the mind and heart of an adult, you can now choose what clothes you will wear, what masks and why. There is nothing left to prove, no one to impress, nothing to fear. From that core place your light can shine without being dimmed by the accumulated filters of fear and pain and doubt tat others have dressed you with, in order to hide their own.

If you took away your style: clothing, hair, makeup; if you took away your possessions: house car, furniture; if you took away your relationships: parents, children, spouses and lovers; if you took away the things that occupy your time: work, chores, hobbies; if you couldn’t do anything: walk, talk, run, read, write, watch TV, what would be left? In the absence of all those things, would you recognise yourself? It is in that place, that place of nothing, where your true nature silently waits for you.



About the Writer

Skipper is a writer for BrooWaha. For more information, visit the writer's website.
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8 comments on Reclaiming the Self

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By Alethea on November 16, 2011 at 12:50 am

I dig it :)

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By D. Sager on November 16, 2011 at 03:06 pm

I am presently being being disassembled and can therefore relate wholeheartedly to this... ;)

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By Skipper on November 17, 2011 at 11:03 am

Thanks all for your kind words.

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By Angie Alaniz on November 30, 2011 at 12:46 am

That's a hard thing to do. Something we don't think to much about or at least I don't, but if we were to really peal everything off, I wonder how many of us would actually recognise ourselves?

Question becomes for me is, why would we?

If we in some cases have worked so hard to do or get where we are at? If you think about it, that would mean becoming almost barbaric in some cases. lol

Ok, so maybe I got carried away.

Article is very intersting and does give me something to think about. :)

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By Skipper on November 30, 2011 at 01:33 pm

Why would we? It's about becoming authentic, about being real. Those things we surround ourselves with have value of course, but in Western culture we identify too closely with them. Once we lose track of ourselves it's very easy to end up in situations and lives that don't reflect who we really are. The result? Unhappiness, addictions, consumerism, greed, dysfunctional behaviors and relationships. A person closley allied with who they are needs very little, and that's freedom.

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By Angie Alaniz on November 30, 2011 at 03:58 pm

Well I guess that depends on how much one lost themself. If its gone as far as a results such as being unhappy becoming addicted and greedy and consider yourself being dysfunctional, then it would be a good time to start pealing layers for a getting back to who you are.

I'm not disagreeing with you, I am just wondering how many people actually feel that way?

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By Skipper on November 30, 2011 at 09:10 pm

To answer that you would have to look at how many people are in unhappy realtionships, lose themselves in consumerism, feel empty, rely on absolute forms of religion, use mood altyering substances to escape, seek power and wealth, define themselves by what they own, and dedicate their lives to accumulating posessions, then it's a lot of people. The problem is they have lived in these artificial shells so long they don't know what they lost. But the evidence is in how they live their lives.

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By Credo on October 13, 2013 at 03:21 am

Article holds great interest, thanks for sharing.

:)Credo

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